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Running a Business During COVID-19 by Ani B.

Running a business may seem easy, but it's not as easy as you think it is. It's undeniable that a lot of businesses are suffering as a result of the pandemic. We interviewed many entrepreneurs to gain perspective and understand their true experience trying to run a business during COVID-19.

An example of a business that's struggling currently is SkyZone. SkyZone is a popular, entertaining indoor trampoline park. The business was very successful until the pandemic hit. Since Skyzone can’t be online, business for the owners has completely turned the other way around because it's way too risky for families to go. All the money that they made in the past is sadly dwindling away. If this process keeps happening, SkyZone could close down!

Since COVID-19 struck, there are fewer and fewer people visiting stores, restaurants, and other public places. Unlike the SkyZone owners, other professions can still be online like personal trainers, architects, and lawyers, but there are still challenges for everyone. A personal trainer, Andrew Kass, stated, “The main difference between online and in-person is that you have to do about 60% more work online.”


Architects can also be online to some extent. They can meet their clients virtually, show their drawings, and discuss plans, but a lot of interaction is involved in the online process. Although working virtually is the best way to interact safely, some parts of the business still have to be in person. Entrepreneur and co-founder of Axis Architects, Elena Romero described, “In-person meetings are really scary because you never know if the person you're meeting is social distancing, wearing a mask, and taking necessary precautions during the pandemic. The problem is that you never know!”

Entrepreneur and co-founder of Axis Architects, Elena Romero described, “In-person meetings are really scary because you never know if the person you're meeting is social distancing, wearing a mask, and taking necessary precautions during the pandemic. The problem is that you never know!”

Immigration lawyers might be able to conduct some of their job virtually, but they have to attend court in person. They have to use the phone to call their clients, but some immigrants don’t have access to any technology, so they have to meet them in person. Immigration lawyer Jennifer Cortez stated that she was scared because of possible exposure to COVID-19.


A dentist can’t clean teeth online. Grecel Agusti, a dentist who runs a business located in Rockville Town Center, mentioned, “Ten weeks not in the office. At the beginning it was scary, but then thankfully they opened the office." When the pandemic first hit, many people questioned whether their businesses could stay afloat. Even though some things have started to go back to normal, that doesn't mean that business owners haven't had to overcome challenges.

Grecel Agusti, a dentist who runs a business located in Rockville Town Center, mentioned, “Ten weeks not in the office. At the beginning it was scary, but then thankfully they opened the office."

Running a business during a pandemic requires everyone to stay as safe as possible. Agusti also expressed, “There's not that big of a difference working before and now, but we can’t have too many people in the dentist office. We clean more, test people's temperatures, and ask questions related to COVID-19 and if patients have been involved with someone who tested positive.”


People need to be careful with the choices they make, especially entrepreneurs. If one person gets a case in their store, then basically the entire store is shut down completely because customers might worry that it is too risky to continue buying from the business. To prevent this from happening, business owners have to be as clean as possible, sanitize, wash their hands well, wear a mask, and more.


Many entrepreneurs struggle a lot with keeping their business running during the pandemic. Even though it's tough, many feel that they can’t call it quits even if times are harsh because the job is their livelihood and how they support their families. In order to keep their business alive, they have to come up with strategies to adapt to working virtually and to adapt to the changes brought about by the pandemic.


Architect Elena Romero communicated, “It's hard working virtually and showing your ideas and plans in Zoom. There's an icon where you can share your screen and that's been really helpful being able to share your ideas, plans, and drawings. We also email our designs.” Shahnur Bostan, the other co-founder of Axis Architects responded, “At first we weren’t getting enough calls. It started becoming really scary, but later on more calls arrived and sooner or later we were back at business.”

Shahnur Bostan, the other co-founder of Axis Architects responded, “At first we weren’t getting enough calls. It started becoming really scary, but later on more calls arrived and sooner or later we were back at business.”

Overall, entrepreneurs have to keep business alive even through the toughest times. Many entrepreneurs we interviewed said the same thing: "At first it was hard, but business got much better.” The challenge of being a business owner during a pandemic has been unlike any other, but throughout the experience, so many people have persevered and held on to hope inside their hearts, motivating them to keep pushing throughout this long journey.

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